NetflixBuilding4There are basically three types of ideas when it comes to Startups. Small Ideas, Big Ideas, and DOA (Dead On Arrival) Ideas. Unfortunately most of the ideas I see fall into the first and last categories. Far too few even come close to The Next Big Idea.

A Small Idea is not really a bad thing. The problem is that there is a low probability that a Small Idea will develop into something that can support the large organization required for execution and an outside investment level to make the company grow at an acceptable pace. There is nothing wrong with a small idea. I have seen many small ideas that can support a tight staff of five to ten people where everyone goes home at the end of the month with a nice paycheck and benefits package. Nothing wrong with that. The problem occurs when a startup team mistakes a Small Idea for a Big Idea. They try to build the Small Idea company along with all its related expenses with the illusion that it is a Big Idea company. Pretty quickly expenses balloon with staff, advertising, programming, office space, travel, etc… while revenues can’t keep pace. Then the bills mount up and things collapse. If you are working on a Small Idea company don’t grow and run it like a Big Idea company until you are absolutely sure the company can support your intended expense ramp up.

UBER RUBIOAnd… I will say it one more time… There is nothing wrong with a Small Idea company just be sure to keep your expenses in line with actual revenues.

DOA (Dead On Arrival) Idea companies are a whole different animal. Sometimes these have the hype, excitement, logos, t-shirts, PowerPoint Presentations, Sharp Teams, plus the overall energy and “feel” of the Next big Idea… But… Once you get past the fog and manufactured excitement of all the company accouterments, the product/service just does not work for a significant number of users, has already been done, or does not have the possibility of attracting more than a few curious early adopter types who probably would not pay anything for the product/service.

A Big Idea company needs to be something that could reasonably create a profitable company with at least $100 million in annual sales. More is good but the $100 million mark is the ideal.

There are many great Big Idea company examples from the past so lets think in general about a few of the past “Big Ideas” and try to categorize them. Things like online Travel booking (Travelocity, Orbitz), online auctions (eBay), service sharing (Uber, AirBnB) and online Classified ads (CraigsList). When you consider these four categories you will have to agree that each probably fit the checklist shown below when they were created. But the key will be to identify new categories going Pinterest-HQforward. More on those potential new categories in a future article.

When I review startup companies I use a six-point Next Big Idea checklist like the one below before I even begin digging in for a deeper look at the team, marketing plan, P/L projections, etc…

The Six-Point Next Big Idea Checklist 

1) The Product/Service is Unique, Special, and Relevant – Are there any products/services that do this now? If so, why your product/service now? What is the target user “pain point” that the product/service will address? Who are the current competitors? How do the target users perform the task now? Does the product/service look like it would have been a great product/service to introduce last year or next year?

The Product or Service may already exist but for some reason your implementation will solve a big problem or in some significant way make things easier, faster, or more efficient. Or just more fun!

2) The Future Looks Good For The Product/Service – Is there is some known significant “game changing” event or trend on the horizon that will make your product/service especially relevant almost overnight?

An example of this would be that your product/service takes advantage of (exploits) some new feature in the next iPad, iPhone, Mac, or version of Windows. Or maybe some new law will require people do something and your product/service makes that much easier for people.

IBM PC In 1984

IBM PC In 1984

3) The Market Size Is Significant And Provable – The potential market is substantial and the target users will pay for the product/service.

The bottom line is that you will need to make money. It’s a fact of business and it will be better for you if your market is significant. Estimate the number of potential users and how much they each would pay. And show your proof on why you think those numbers are correct. The best ideas in the world (even from huge companies with big marketing budgets) will not endure if the market is too small. Examples are Microsoft webtv PLUS, Apple Newton, Sony BetaMAx, and smokeless cigarettes. If you are interested CLICK HERE for a list of the entire top 25 Biggest Product Flops of All Time.

4) The User Experience Delights People – Can the benefits/features be clearly defined and experienced by the target user? Is it confusing or clear? Is there an “aha, I need this!” moment for the target user? Is there a moment of delight and surprise for the target user? How forgettable is the product/service? Is it something people will want to talk about and share?

The Next Big Idea will be something that can be quickly communicated either in words or by demonstration. And when people see it they will immediately

The First Macintosh Computer 1984

The First Macintosh Computer 1984

understand it. They will line up to buy the product/service.

I remember the first time I saw the Apple Macintosh. (Yes, to entice my company to make software for the Mac, Apple sent me a Mac Computer many months before they were released in stores.) As soon as that first screen popped up I knew the new apple computer would be a success. Especially because it was sitting on my desk next to an IBM PC with a DOS operating system that had green glowing characters on a black screen. The Macintosh looked easier and was a delight to use. It still is.

5) A Prototype Can Be Tested Right Now – How fast can a prototype be created for testing and how much will a prototype cost?

0524_chipotle_new_630x420The faster you can get a minimally functioning prototype in front of users the better. You need to see how people really respond to the product/service in a real life setting.

6) There Is A Significant Moat – What is the moat? What will keep others out of your product/service space long enough to build a user base? Can you patent some technology? Is there some type of exclusive arrangement? Is the market too expensive for others to enter? Is there some unique distribution channel? Is there some unique aspect of the product/service that cannot be easily duplicated? Is there some unique customer relationship required to make a sale?… The bigger the moat the better.
There will always be great ideas that will not make it through my Big Idea checklist but still go on to succeed. ushg_shackshake_940_09Companies like Chipotle and Shakshack come to mind. Why would we ever need another place that makes burritos when we have Taco Bell? Why another burger place to compete with 5 Guys and all the rest? But these two companies are on a roll.

If your dream is to start a Big Idea Company the key is to run your potential company ideas through the six-points above or…. just work harder on your burrito and burger recipes.

 

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